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Fokker DVIII & R3600
( Paul Musso )

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Paul Musso's Fokker DVIII Project (1st of its kind):

Paul and his friend Karl Biegert work and collaborate in building aircraft and they started this full scale Fokker DVIII (also known as also E.V) well before the completion of his R2800 powered Fokker EIII "Eindekker" and well before the advent of the R3600. Their joint experience and an eye for detail as a builders shows in the quality of work to be seen in both aircraft.

Paul and Karl welcome contact from anyone seeking information or help; they can and do build custom wings. Contact info follows:

E-MAIL mcbrides@comcast.net
PHONE 609-206-2290


Click on thumbnails to enlarge...

Paul Musso builer of this Fokker DVIII

Sive view of Fokker DVIII

Fokker DVIII Cowling

Ready for Rotec's R3600 radial.

Note the recess for the R3600

Fokker DVIII Instrumentation


Potted History:

Year Built: 1918
Wingspan: 29', 4"
Cruise/Top Speed: 90 mph 120 mph
Gross Weight: 1,334 lbs.
Engine: Oberursal Rotary (110 hp - original)
Better performance with Gnome Rotary (160 hp)
Will perform even better with a Rotec 3600 Radial.

This was the last German fighter designed and built by Anthony Fokker during World War I. It was commissioned in the last weeks of the war and had little time to prove itself. This is probably the reason why there are so few of the original around. However, its estimated that about 300 were produced.

Anthony Fokker ended the War as he started, with a monoplane design. Unlike his earlier 1916 Fokker E-III "Eindekker”, this one had a cantilever wing and had no external bracing wires. It combined survivability, firepower and adaptability in a sturdy airframe.

The plane was somewhat under powered with the original 110 HP Oberursal Rotary; and explains why the 160 Gnome Rotary was the prefered powerplant (after the war concluded). That said the aircraft was a highly respected machine.

The Fokker D.VIII has the distinction of recording the last air kill in the First World War and was often referred to as 'the Flying Razor' by the Allies.